Tag Archives: veal

New Orleans Restaurants- My review of Annunciation

Californian Sunshine in a glass

Californian Sunshine in a glass

Out of the blue I received an email asking would I like to go to New Orleans. So one week later I was touching down in the Louis Armstrong Airport in New Orleans.

The whole heat- humidity- city is another post, but this is about my last meal, so to speak. A very good friend, had asked another good friend, for recommendations on eating in NOLA.  Annunciation, in the Warehouse District appealed to me, so off I headed.  I’ll say one thing for American hospitality, they do it in buckets.

The bar in Annunciation

The bar in Annunciation

The welcome was genuine, with no awkwardness for being by myself.  I wanted to try an American wine, no point travelling all the way from Europe and having a European wine.  The first course of Fried Oysters, Brie and Spinach was as good as advertised, and like nothing I’d had before.  The oysters saltiness came through the dish and cut the creaminess of the brie.

Fried Oysters with Brie and Spinach

Fried Oysters with Brie and Spinach

The picture, to be clear, doesn’t do it justice! I struggled to choose between a number of entrée dishes offered.  And in the end it came down to a choice between two rose veal dishes.  The chosen one had a number of elements that I love, asparagus, bearnaise sauce and escalope of veal.

Veal Oyster

Veal Oyster (and none in sight!)

I have to admit, I didn’t manage to finish the main course, but I really wanted to try the dessert.  I would have quite happily tried any of them. But the one that was suggested by my server was the winner.

Dessert= perfection in a glass.

Dessert= perfection in a glass.

Butterscotch mousse, with salted caramel and whipped cream.  It sounds heavy, but it was light as a feather, and I definitely managed to finish it!

The whole meal from start to finish was excellent, not overly priced, and I was surprised that the room wasn’t packed.  If you are heading to this eclectic city try this restaurant.  Do it, you won’t regret it.

 

More cheesiness

We get to make our own cheese.  Now all I need is to grow grapes and my life is complete.  Only joking… but I have wandered around cheese making for quite some time.  We’ve bought rennet, moulds etc, and really I just need to get on with it.  We did make a cheddar-esque cheese at home at some stage, and in actual fact, although we really didn’t have a notion of what we were doing, it tasted quite cheddar like, not a threat in the cheese production world however.

Clancy met the eager cheesemakers in the dairy, and we donned VERY fetching aprons.  As I microbiologist at heart, and by training, I fully appreciate how cleaniness in this case is essential.

My fetching Dairy wear

My fetching Dairy wear

Clancy had put the milk on to heat, and had added the vegetable rennet and culture.  As an aside, traditionally the rennet came from the lining of the fourth stomach of young calves, this was chopped and added to the milk, but in this case, and nowadays, the rennet is produced in the lab so we can look the calves straight in the eye when leaving the dairy (mind you – don’t mention veal!)

All hands on deck

All hands on deck

Next we removed, through a sieve, one third of the whey, and topped it up with warm water.

Removing approximately one third of the whey.

Removing approximately one third of the whey.

This is to “wash” the curd, and the warm water raises the temperature of the mixture higher, while our stirring mixed it intensively with the water.  Clancy carefully monitored the temperature, and I timed the stages.

Then Clancy put “our” curds into clean mould “nets”, these were left to the side while all were filled, and then topped up, as even the simple act of sitting for a short period of time meant that more liquid had drained.

Filling the cheese moulds

Filling the cheese moulds

These moulds were then covered with a lid and weight.  Clancy then instructed us on the art of turning the cheese (to reduce the appearance of elephants foot!).  This looks a lot easier than it actually is.  We all took turns at turning our cheese, and some kind co- students offered to further turn my cheese the two more times it required that first night.  At the weekend it was un-moulded and washed in brine, and placed in the temperature controlled cabinets.  Here it stays, and we turn it daily.

My cheese! The second one in on the left.

My cheese! The second one in on the left.

Cheeses that have been there for longer, have different coloured rinds.

The collection of cheeses.

The collection of cheeses.

Our cheese really needs to sit for 3 months before tasting.  Not enough time for me to make wine to go with it, but I may just manage some cheese biscuits.